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Alaska Department of Fish and Game P.O. campaign, U.S. Marbled Murrelet Overview, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology A seabird that’s also a forest bird, the Marbled Murrelet fishes along the foggy Pacific Coast, … … In 2007, the US Geological Survey published a status report on Marbled Murrelets in Alaska and British Columbia. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation is currently partnering with federal agencies, universities and conservation organizations to strengthen monitoring efforts and conduct ongoing research, primarily in Southeast Alaska. [5], From southeast Alaska southward, marbled murrelets use mature or old-growth forest stands near the coastline for nesting. The Long-billed has a pale white throat, lacking in the Marbled. Fish & Wildlife Service. Marbled murrelets feed below the water surface on small fish and invertebrates. In winter plumage, the Marbled murrelet has a white neck collar, absent in Long-billed. Collection of links to additional marbled murrelet resources. Fish & Wildlife Service. Some also forage on inland freshwater lakes. Box 115526 1255 W. 8th Street Juneau, AK 99811-5526 The Marbled murrelet is shorter-billed and slightly smaller than the Long-billed murrelet. [7], Stand size is also important in nest sites. Flocks of 50 or more birds have been observed near freshwater lakes. Marbled Murrelets in Alaska John F. Piatt1 Nancy L. Naslund2 The bulk of the North American population of Marbled Murrelet resides in Alaska. Marbled Murrelet Overview, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology A seabird that’s also a forest bird, the Marbled Murrelet fishes along the foggy Pacific Coast, … The marbled murrelet feeds at sea both in pelagic offshore areas (often associating with upwellings) and inshore in protected bays and fiords. [3] In California, marbled murrelets are usually absent from stands less than 60 acres (24 ha) in size. Marbled Murrelet Food Habits and Prey Ecology Esther E. Burkett1 Abstract: Information on food habits of the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) was compiled from systematic stud-ies and anecdotal reports from Alaska to California. In northern populations, murrelets nest on the ground among rocks, as do other related murrelet species. Marbled murrelets feed within 1,640 feet (500 m) of shore. [3] All marbled murrelet nests found in Washington, Oregon, and California were located in old-growth trees that ranged from 38 inches (88 cm) d.b.h. Research. The bird closely resembles its closest relative, the Long-billed murrelet; in fact, these species were considered conspecific up until 1998. [2], Marbled murrelets are coastal birds that occur mainly near saltwater within 1.2 miles (2 km) of shore. Subadults feed singly; but in early July, when pairs of adults are still feeding young, mixed flocks begin to form. [3] Marbled murrelets are semicolonial in nesting habits. [2][4] In California, nests are most often located in redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) dominated stands with scattered Sitka spruce, western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and Douglas-fir. Major differ-ences between the winter and summer diets were apparent, with [2][4] These forests are generally characterized by large trees (>32 inches [80 cm] diameter at breast height (d.b.h. The marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a small seabird from the North Pacific. Their numbers in Alaska, however, may be a misleading indicator of the bird’s security. The marbled murrelet has declined in number since humans began logging its nest trees in the latter half of the 19th century. Corvid populations, such as Steller's jays, crows, and ravens, are expanding into old-growth forests. Fish and Wildlife Service Average Weight: 258-357 grams Plumage Description: Marbled Murrelets are relatively abundant in Alaska compared with populations in other parts of their range. In Alaska, the Marbled Murrelet is considered a Bird of Conservation Concern by the U.S. Interestingly, the Marbled Murrelet once was known as the "Australian Bumble Bee" by fishermen and as the "fogbird" or "fog lark" by loggers. The listed portion of the species range extends from the Canadian border south to central California. [2], Marbled murrelets often forage in pairs but do not feed in large flocks as do other alcids. The marbled murrelet ranges from the Aleutian Islands and southern Alaska to central California. It has pointed wings and plumage that varies by season. [9], Marbled murrelet winter habitat is the same as the nesting and foraging habitat. It nests in old-growth forestsor on the ground at higher latitudes where trees cannot grow. Lured by food scraps left by campers and hikers[citation needed], with increased access aggravated by the patchwork forests created by industrial logging[citation needed], corvids more frequently discover marbled murrelet nests in areas where these predator species were not previously found. As a federally listed species, Marbled Murrelets are under the jurisdiction of the U.S. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Wildlife Conservation is currently partnering with federal agencies, universities and conservation organizations to strengthen monitoring efforts and conduct ongoing research, primarily in Southeast Alaska. [2], In northern regions where coniferous forests nest sites are unavailable, marbled murrelets occupy alpine or tundra near the ocean. Marbled murrelets also occur in stands dominated by Port-Orford-cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana). with a mean of 80 inches (203 cm) d.b.h. [2][3] Some principal foods include sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus), Pacific herring (Clupea haringus), capelin (Mallotus villosus), shiner perch, and the invertebrates Euphausia pacifica and Thysanoessa spinifera. Its habit of nesting in trees was suspected but not documented until a tree-climber found a chick in 1974, making it one of the last North American bird species to have its nest described. Habitat must be sufficiently open to allow for easy flight. It is a member of the auk family. [4], Marbled murrelets occur in summer from Alaska's Kenai Peninsula, Barren islands, and Aleutian Islands south along the coast of North America to Point Sal, Santa Barbara County, in south-central California. [2] Fledglings fly directly from the nest to the ocean. (1989). It lays one egg on a platform of lichen or moss on these branches (less often on the ground). They have been recorded as far south as Imperial Beach of San Diego County, California. Young marbled murrelets remain in the nest longer than other alcids and molt into their juvenile plumage before leaving the nest. Nestlings fledge in 28 days. [2] However, marbled murrelets have been found up to 59 miles (95 km) inland in Washington, 35 miles (56 km) inland in Oregon, 22 miles (37 km) inland in northern California, and 11 miles (18 km) inland in central California.

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